Family Literacy Materials

The materials on this list are for educators, practitioners, parents, caregivers and anyone who works in early childhood education, emergent literacy, parents and families, or is interested in family literacy. Every item on this list is available, either from the library or online.


Family Literacy Overview

The BC framework of statements and standards of best practices in family literacy.
Prepared by Jean Rasmussen. Vancouver, BC: Literacy BC, 2000. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/research/framwork/cover.htm
» Divided into five sections, this document defines family literacy, outlines the goals of family literacy, and presents statements of values in family literacy, best practices in family literacy and standards of best practices. It is intended to provide support and information to those involved in family literacy in British Columbia.

A communication framework for family literacy: bridging differences, planning, and building skill sets.
Jean Fowler and Sydney Hook. June 2005.
» This guide contains an introduction to definitions of family literacy and the role of interaction as fundamental to adult/child relationships.

A critical discourse analysis of family literacy practices: power in and out of print.
By Rebecca Rogers. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2003.
» Explores the complexity of family literacy practices through an in-depth case study of one family, including the issues of power and identity, and debates about the connections between literacy and society.

Early literacy work with families: policy, practice & research.
Cathy Nutbrown, Peter Hannon & Anne Morgan. London: Sage, 2005.
» This book describes the REAL (Raising Early Achievement in Literacy) Project in Britain. It includes examples of background theory, family literacy work, a discussion of interviews with parents and children, a framework for evaluating family literacy work, and examples of practical sessions for professional development.

Family literacy across contexts. Foundations in family literacy, Module V.
By Jim Anderson, et al. [Edmonton, AB]: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Examines family literacy within three specific contexts: health literacy, school/family literacy connections, and public library/family literacy connections.

Family literacy and health. (Online)
By Janet Shively, Suzanne Dionne and Lorri Sauvé. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy, 2007.
www.en.copian.ca/library/research/famlithea/cover.htm
» Developed as a component of the Centre for Family Literacy’s “Foundations in Family Literacy” resource, this module explores the relationship between health literacy and family literacy, and looks at ways that health and family literacy practitioners can work together to address common concerns.

Family literacy: from theory to practice.
Edited by Andrea DeBruin-Parecki and Barbara Krol-Sinclair. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2003.
» This book explores the theory related to family literacy, outlines specific strategies, describes some family literacy programs, and discusses assessment and evaluation.

Family literacy in the community. Foundations in family literacy, Module IV.
By Dawn Clark, et al. [Edmonton, AB]: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Examines how community building supports and impacts the development of family literacy, home languages and cultures. Includes sections on creating partnerships within diverse communities, including immigrant and Aboriginal populations.

Family literacy matters: a longitudinal parent-child literacy intervention study.
Written by Lynda M. Phillips et al. Calgary, AB: Detselig, 2006.
» By following families over three years, the authors of this Canadian study have convincingly shown the power of a family literacy program to change lives.

Family literacy tool kit. (Website)
Based on the work of Tam Miller and Sheryl Harrow. (n.d.) Saskatchewan Literacy Network.
www.sk.literacy.ca/pages/familyL.html
» A toolkit outlining the basic principles of family literacy, program development and the importance of literacy within a child’s life.

Fundamentals of family literacy. Foundations in family literacy, Module I.
By Adele Thomas, Janet Shively and Elizabeth Wilson. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Intended to broaden and deepen the goals and context for family literacy programs, and to explore the topic from a new framework involving diverse values and principles, and community engagement.

Handbook of family literacy. 2nd ed.
Edited by Barbara Hanna Wasik. New York: Routledge, 2012.
» This handbook is a comprehensive source of information on family literacy issues, services, and research. This second edition includes all new articles written by international experts from different disciplines. It documents the need for literacy education for children and parents, describes early literacy and math development within the home, analyzes interventions in home and center settings, and examines the issues faced by men and women with low literacy skills. Cultural issues are examined. Includes detailed guidelines for ensuring program quality and a new evaluation perspective.

Helping communities bloom: a family literacy resource guide for British Columbia.
By Literacy BC. Vancouver, BC: Literacy BC, 2008.
Also available online at http://www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/lbc/helping/helping.pdf
» An introduction to family literacy in British Columbia, this guide includes step-by-step instructions for starting and maintaining community-based family literacy programs.

Leadership in family literacy. Foundations in family literacy, Module VI.
By Judy Baker, et al. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Provides learner opportunities to explore the concept of leadership in the field of family literacy. It includes family literacy program evaluation tools and planning strategies. It also offers an introduction to research approaches to program administration and fund development.

Literacy with adults and families. Foundations in family literacy, Module II.
By Judith Baker, et al. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Examines the critical role of adult literacy in family literacy programming, the principles of adult literacy, and the ways that Essential Skills can be incorporated into family literacy programming

Many pathways to literacy: young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers, and communities.
Edited by Eve Gregory, Susi Long, Dinah Volk. New York: Routledge Falmer, 2004.
» This resource contains a series of cross-cultural studies examining contexts outside of school where children learn language and literacy with siblings, grandparents, peers and community members

Portraits of literacy across families, communities, and schools: intersections and tensions.
Edited by Jim Anderson, Maureen Kendrick, Theresa Rogers and Suzanne Smythe.  Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates, 2005.
» A collection of articles examining literacy from a wide variety of perspectives in a number of settings.

Promising practices in family literacy programs. (Online)
By Maureen Sanders and Janet Shively.
www.en.copian.ca/library/research/ppflp/cover.htm
» This article is organized around five statements of principle that are the basis of promising practice in family literacy. Brief examples of programs implementing these principles are described. While not comprehensive it gives an overview of the variety of family literacy work done in Canada.

Simple steps.
By the Yukon Literacy Coalition. Whitehorse, YT: Yukon Literacy Coalition, 2005.
» This workbook provides a step-by-step guide to planning and implementing family literacy projects in the community. It includes background information on family literacy, suggestions for different activities, and seven steps to plan your literacy project including writing effective proposals and monitoring results.

Special relationships: how families learn together.
By Maureen Banbury. Leicester, UK: National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE), 2005.
» “What is the unique nature of intergenerational family learning, where family members are involved in joint learning sessions? This publication sets out to discover whether there is something unique about the learning that happens within the special relationships that are family intergenerational groupings.”

to top


Aboriginal Family Literacy

Aboriginal family literacy initiative: building a movement to promote, support and empower Aboriginal family literacy in British Columbia: a proposal and implementation plan for the BC Aboriginal family literacy initiative for 2008. (Online)
Prepared by the Urban Aboriginal Family Literacy Working Group. Victoria, BC: BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres, 2008.
www.bcaafc.com/images/stories/PDFs/bcaafc_family_lit_implementfinal.pdf

Aboriginal literacy and parenting skills (A.-L.A.P.S.): facilitators’ guide & participants’ material.
By Laureen MacKenzie and Elaine Cairns. Calgary, AB: Bow Valley College, 1998.
» A program designed for people with an Aboriginal background who may need help in assisting their children’s literacy development and who may wish to talk about their parenting strategies.

Aboriginal PALS family literacy resource.
Gail Stromquist & Janet Stromquist. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2010.
» Adapted from the Parents as Literacy Supporters (PALS) program, this resource presents a framework for developing a family literacy program for families with preschool and kindergarten children in Aboriginal communities. Based on indigenous ways of knowing, and developed in consultation with elders, the resource includes feature poems for each of the seven sessions, as well as suggested learning centres with accompanying support materials. Designed to be used in conjunction with Aboriginal PALS training.

BC First Nations head start: on-reserve program. (Website)
Vancouver, BC: BC First Nations Head Start, 2007.
www.bcfnhs.org/
» This website describes the Health Canada funded program to enhance early childhood development, school readiness and overall family health for First Nations preschool children on reserve. Resources to help implement the program along with a list of on-reserve Head Start sites in BC are included.

Completing the circle: teaching our first teachers.
By the Ontario Native Literacy Coalition. Owen Sound, ON: Ontario Native Literacy Coalition, 2008.
» This program is designed for Aboriginal adults who want to help their children’s literacy development and who are interested in talking about their parenting strategies. It is culturally relevant and sensitive to the needs of First Nations. The eight sessions include detailed facilitator’s Notes and handouts.

Family literacy in the community. Foundations in family literacy, Module IV.
By Dawn Clark, et al. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Examines how community building supports and impacts the development of family literacy, home languages and cultures. Includes sections on creating partnerships within diverse communities, including immigrant and Aboriginal populations.

to top


Early Learning and Emergent Literacy

Activity 2: a fresh look: children’s language and literacy development, LAPS: Literacy and Parenting Skills.
Calgary, AB.: Further Education Society, 2008.
» Explores children’s resources used in LAPS programs. Rhymes, songs, games and other activities have been augmented into each LAPS session, in addition to valuable information based on the latest research on brain development and language and literacy acquisition in parents and young children.

Babies love looks: a guide for grown-ups.
By Catherine and Laurence Anholt.
» This story for parents of babies or very young children, or any adult who is around babies, emphasizes the importance of reading to babies at a very early age. It is part of the BC Books for Babies program.

Checklist for parents: hand in hand from a to z!.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» A program for developing parenting skills and early intervention strategies. Intended for the parents of newborns. Contains handouts and checklists for parents.

Child development and emergent literacy. Foundations in family literacy, Module III.
By Leslie Allan, et al. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Explores the developmental principles of child development, including the importance of play and family involvement.

Children’s play: the roots of reading.
Edited by Edward F. Zigler, Dorothy G. Singer, Sandra J. Bishop-Josef. Washington, DC: Zero To Three Press, 2004.
» The articles in this book demonstrate the importance of play in helping children learn basic literacy skills, social awareness, and creative problem solving. It includes a summary of the developmental benefits of play, examples of research applied in practice, a multicultural perspective on play, and ideas for how to play imaginative games with children.

Communication plan for emergent literacy: hand in hand from a to z!
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» A communication plan to analyze the entire “Hand in hand from A to Z program” in order to develop communication activities.

Dad’s playbook: coaching kids to read. (Online)
Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2006.
lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/Dads_Playbook.pdf
» Outlines five skills children need to become readers and 20 fathers tell how they help their kids learn to read.

Emergent literacy training: hand in hand from a to z!
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» Contains two formal training sessions: one on emergent literacy and the other on the adult learning process. Intended for staff of organizations offering services to children from birth to 4 years of age and their families.

First steps in reading and writing: hand in hand from a to z!
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» Fosters the development of emergent reading and writing skills and the general development of 3-year-old children, while providing parents with the necessary tools and support. Intended for children 3 years of age and their parents.

Food flair: Leap BC early learning practitioner’s resource.
Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2008. Information and training modules available online at http://decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/food-flair/
» This resource contains ideas to help early childhood specialists and caregivers support healthy eating for young children. It emphasizes the importance of combining healthy eating with opportunities for physical activity, literacy and play. Created by nutritionists and adapted for use by early learning practitioners. Training materials and activity cards are available online at decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/food-flair/

Hand in hand: emergent literacy from a to z.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» An outline of the entire conceptual framework of the “Hand in hand from A to Z” project, the partnership process, and the development of various activities. It also contains an overview of the activities that make up the project’s portfolio. Intended for staff of organizations offering services to children from birth to 4 years of age and their families.

Handbook of language and literacy development: a roadmap from 0 to 60 months. (Website)
London, ON: University of Western Ontario and the University of Alberta, 2006-2009.
www.theroadmap.ualberta.ca/
» Authoritative information on the factors that influence children’s language and literacy development from a variety of perspectives. It is written for parents, caregivers, teachers, early childhood educators, public health nurses, intervention workers, medical professionals and other community health and education workers. Each topic provides information for different age groups and includes a parent narrative and a research review.

Hop: healthy opportunities for preschoolers: Leap BC early learning practitioners resource.
By Viviene Anne Temple. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2007. Available for purchase: http://decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/hop/
» Designed for early learning practitioners, this book offers a variety of activities for children aged 3 to 5 years. The activities are designed to promote literacy, physical activity and healthy eating. Background information and reproducible handouts for parents are included.  Activity cards are available online at  decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/hop/

Hop: healthy opportunities for preschoolers: Leap BC family resource.
By Viviene Anne Temple and Allison Preece. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2007. Also available online at decoda.ca/wp-content/files_flutter/1314125129HOP_resource.pdf
» Written for parents and other caregivers, this book offers a variety of play activities to stimulate healthy development in children 3 to 5 years old. The activities are simple and enjoyable, and promote physical activity, literacy and healthy eating.  Activity cards are available online at  decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/hop/

I love when we count. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2008.
» Designed for parents, this DVD emphasizes the importance of family in developing children’s numeracy skills. Experts offer recommendations on easy activities that parents can do to promote numeracy in children from birth to seven years of age.

I love when we talk. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2010.
» Shows parents how talking with children strengthens their communication skills, builds their confidence, and provides a solid base for literacy and learning.

I love when you read. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain.Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media Inc., 2007.
» This DVD features children and their parents engaged in easy, age-appropriate activities that support literacy and encourage a love of reading. Narrative by experts is included. This is especially effective at bringing literacy information to parents and caregivers with low literacy skills.

Language and literacy: from birth… for life: research summary.
By Rachael Millard and Michelle Waese. [Ottawa, ON]: Canadian Language & Literacy Research Network, 2007.
» This resource kit is based on the latest research into how young children develop the ability to use language and to read and write. Child care practitioners play a vital role in fostering language and literacy skills. The kit is comprised of a summary of current research on language and literacy development in young children, and a CD-ROM featuring workshops, interviews and video clips of effective practice techniques. Portions of the resource kit are available freely online at http://www.cllrnet.ca/knowledge/resourcekit .

Learning to talk and listen: an oral language resource for early childhood caregivers. (Online)
Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2010.
lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/LearningtoTalkandListen.pdf
» Summarizes research findings on the relationship between young children’s oral language skills and later reading achievement, and suggests what this means for early literacy practices to promote children’s language development.

Many pathways to literacy: young children learning with siblings, grandparents, peers, and communities.
Edited by Eve Gregory, Susi Long, Dinah Volk. New York: Routledge Falmer, 2004.
» This resource contains a series of cross-cultural studies examining contexts outside of school where children learn language and literacy with siblings, grandparents, peers and community members.

Move: move with me from birth to three: LEAP BC family resource.
By Rebecca Milne Frechette. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2007. Also available online at decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/move/
»
Written for parents and other caregivers, this book includes activities to use with children from birth to three years of age. The activities are designed to promote physical movement while incorporating early language and literacy development and healthy eating

Play and literacy in early childhood: research from multiple perspectives.
Edited by Kathleen A. Roskos and James F. Christie. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2007.
» Presents studies and research on the significance of play in the literacy development of young children.

Play workshops: hand in hand from a to z!.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» Play workshops were designed to foster children’s development and introduce them to written language. Intended for use with 12- to 24-month olds and their parents.

Reading magic: why reading aloud to our children will change their lives forever.
By Mem Fox. New York: Harcourt, 2008.
» Mem Fox explains the importance of reading to young children: It impacts their ability to read and learn for their entire lives. Fox outlines with passion and humour how, when and where caretakers and educators can take the opportunity to read aloud to children.

Rethinking early childhood education. 1st ed.
Edited by Ann Pelo. Milwaukee, Wisc.: Rethinking Schools, 2008.
» This book shows how educators can nurture empathy, an ecological consciousness, curiosity, collaboration, and activism in young children. It is an anthology of stories about social justice teaching with young children. Included here is outstanding writing from childcare teachers, early-grade public school teachers, scholars, and parents.

Sharing pictures and words: hand in hand from a to z!, introduction to the program.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» A program for developing parenting skills and early intervention strategies. Intended for use with 12- to 24-month olds and their parents. Aims at developing and consolidating parenting competencies related to emergent reading and writing.

Talk activity cards. Leap BC. (Online)
Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2010.  Available at decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/talk/page/8/#t
» Talk™ activity cards are a series of 40 illustrated cards with activities encouraging learning through play, and early literacy and oral language development. These activities are designed for families, caregivers or early learning practitioners to enjoy with children from birth to 5 years.

to top


ESL Family Literacy

50 strategies for communicating and working with diverse families. 2nd ed.
Janet Gonzalez-Mena.  Boston: Pearson, 2010.
»This book provides practical strategies on partnering with diverse families to support, enhance, and maximize the quality of care and education of young children.  Many strategies look at creating a climate of trust by communicating with families in a collaborative way.

The cultural nature of human development.
Barbara Rogoff. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.
»The Cultural Nature of Human Development presents an account of human development that looks at both the differences and similarities among cultures. Beyond demonstrating that “culture matters,” Rogoff focuses on how culture matters in human development-what patterns help make sense of the cultural aspects of human development.

Empowering family-teacher partnerships: building connections within diverse communities.
Mick Coleman. Los Angeles: SAGE, 2012.
»Designed for people learning to work or working in preK to Grade 5 educational settings, this book offers information on working with diverse family structures and culturally diverse families. It includes background information and research on family-teacher partnerships, background information on contemporary family lives, and practical strategies for engaging families in their children’s education.

English as a second language: literacy and parenting skills (LAPS/ESL): facilitators’ guide and participants’ material.
By Elaine Cairns and Laureen MacKenzie. Calgary, AB: Alberta Vocational College, 1996.
» This program is designed for people from other cultures, to help facilitate their family’s adjustment to Canada.

Family literacy in the community. Foundations in family literacy, Module IV.
By Dawn Clark, et al. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy Society of Alberta, 2009.
» Examines how community building supports and impacts the development of family literacy, home languages and cultures. Includes sections on creating partnerships within diverse communities, including immigrant and Aboriginal populations.

Home, school, and community collaboration: culturally responsive family engagement. 2nd ed.
Kathy B. Grant, Julie A. Ray. Thousand Oaks: SAGE, 2012.
» This comprehensive textbook uses the culturally responsive family support model to examine working effectively with diverse families in early childhood and elementary education. Written by experts from a number of perspectives, it includes research-based information and strategies to help teachers understand, appreciate, and support diverse families, as well as promote family engagement.

Home-school connections in a multicultural society: learning from and with culturally and linguistically diverse families.
Maria Luiza Dantas, Patrick C. Manyak, eds. NY: Routledge, 2010.
» Explores how teachers can recognize and utilize the resources in culturally and linguistically diverse families to support school learning.  Shows how to build positive relationships and develop learning activities that incorporate the children’s experiences.

Implementing family literacy programs for linguistically and culturally diverse populations: key elements to consider. (Online)
By Delia C. Garcia and Deborah J. Hasson. School Community Journal, v 14, n 1, p. 113-137, Spri-Sum 2004.
www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/EJ794831.pdf
» This article examines key elements for effective implementation of family literacy programs for parents of school children. Includes the role of needs assessments, recruitment and retention, curriculum design and materials, staffing, and interagency collaboration.

LINC-parenting program: manual and curriculum guidelines.
Developed by Toronto District School Board, 2000. Also available online at wiki.settlementatwork.org/wiki/LINC_Parenting_Program:_Manual_and_Curriculum_Guidelines
» The LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada) Parenting delivery model was designed specifically for newcomers with infants and young children. LINC parents learn English by participating in parent/child activities and guided group discussions about the development and behaviour of their children.

Multicultural families, home literacies, and mainstream schooling.
Guofang Li, ed. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Pub., 2009.
» This collection of articles focuses on students’ out of school literacy and learning, culturally different patterns of parent involvement in the home, parents’ interactions with mainstream schools, and policy implications for minority and teacher education.  Diverse family literacy practices of families from five different cultural and ethnic backgrounds are examined.

Parenting for academic success: teacher’s resource manual.
By Janet M. Fulton, et al. Louisville, KY: National Center for Family Literacy, 2005.
» This 12 unit curriculum is designed for parents who are non-native speakers of English with children in kindergarten through grade three. It builds parents’ English language skills and increases their ability to support their children’s language and literacy development. The twelve parent workbooks that accompany this curriculum are also available as a separate resource.

Practitioner toolkit: working with adult English language learners.
Designed and written by The National Center for Family Literacy and The National Center for ESL Literacy Education at the Center for Applied Linguistics. Louisville, KY: NCFL, 2004. Also available online at www.nald.ca/library/research/practool/practool.pdf
» This resource is designed to give support to adult education and family literacy instructors who are new to serving adult English language learners and their families in rural, urban, and faith- and community-based programs. There is a focus in ESL and family literacy.

RAPP: Reading and Parents Program: the multicultural collection.
Developed by the Family Literacy Centre of Kingston Literacy & Skills; Anne Jackson, Jenna Willoughby, eds. Kingston, Ont.: Kingston Literacy & Skills, 2011.
» The Reading and Parents Program (RAPP) pack was developed to encourage family reading and help parents support their children’s emergent literacy skills development. This resource, the sixth in the RAPP series of manuals, presents instructions for producing and using RAPP packs, and specific material for producing RAPP packs for parents whose first language is not English (although the material is suitable for all parents). The manual includes reading and language hints, a craft idea, a selection of poetry based on a book’s theme, and children’s fine motor activities for each of 12 titles.

Talking about wordless picture books: a tutor strategy supporting English language learners. (Online)
Janet M. Fulton. National Center for Family Literacy, 2006.
www.famlit.org/pdf/talking-about-wordless-picture-books.pdf
» This resource was designed to support tutors who are working with low-intermediate English language learner parents in family literacy programs. It provides activities and strategies to help these parents develop conversational skills.

to top


Instructor and Tutor Materials

1-2-3 Rhyme with me: facilitator’s manual. (Online)
Donna Mulders & Jill Vaydik. Yellowknife, NT: NWT Literacy Council, 2010.
www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/nwt/123rhyme/123rhyme_manual.pdf
 1-2-3 Rhyme with me: rhyme and song booklet. (Online)
Yellowknife, NT: NWT Literacy Council, 2010. Available at: www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/nwt/123booklet/123booklet.pdf
» An interactive program for parents and young children. They meet once a week to learn rhymes and songs. Parents gain confidence and parenting skills, which help them to support their children’s learning and literacy.

50 strategies for communicating and working with diverse families. 2nd ed.
Janet Gonzalez-Mena.  Boston: Pearson, 2010.
»This book provides practical strategies on partnering with diverse families to support, enhance, and maximize the quality of care and education of young children.  Many strategies look at creating a climate of trust by communicating with families in a collaborative way.

Conversations with parents: a series of possibilities: a practitioner’s guide to family literacy sessions with parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.
Lynda Homer, et al. Fredericton, NB: Literacy Coalition of New Brunswick, 2008. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/cwp/cwp.pdf
» A flexible program designed to be responsive to family priorities and needs. It encourages community practitioners to shape each program according to the needs and circumstances of their communities, to best help the families involved in accomplishing their goals.

Einstein never used flash cards: how our children really learn – and why they need to play more and memorize less.
Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff with Diane Eyer. Emmaus, Pa.: Rodale, 2003.
» Written for parents and educators, this book looks at how young children develop and learn. It explains how a love of learning can be nurtured through play.

Empowering family-teacher partnerships: building connections within diverse communities.
Mick Coleman. Los Angeles: SAGE, 2012.
» Designed for people learning to work or working in preK to Grade 5 educational settings, this book offers information on working with diverse family structures and culturally diverse families. It includes background information and research on family-teacher partnerships, background information on contemporary family lives, and practical strategies for engaging families in their children’s education

Family literacy: from theory to practice.
Edited by Andrea DeBruin-Parecki and Barbara Krol-Sinclair. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2003.
» This book explores the theory related to family literacy, outlines specific strategies, describes some family literacy programs, and discusses assessment and evaluation.

Family literacy in action: a guide for literacy program facilitators.
Janette Pelltier, Kathleen Hipfner-Boucher, Antoinette Doyle. Markham, ON: Scholastic Education, 2010.
»This is the guide for a family literacy program based on concepts and strategies that promote emergent literacy development at home.  The program is presented in 9 sessions, each based on a strand of emergent literacy.  Sessions include a shared storytime, a child-only and parent-only breakout time, and a family together time.  Detailed instructions for implementing the sessions are provided.

Family literacy tool kit. (Website)
Based on the work of Tam Miller and Sheryl Harrow. (n.d.) Saskatchewan Literacy Network.
www.sk.literacy.ca/pages/familyL.html
» A toolkit outlining the basic principles of family literacy, program development and the importance of literacy within a child’s life.

Family math fun.
By Kate Nonesuch. Duncan, BC: Vancouver Island University, 2008. Also available online at www.nald.ca/library/learning/familymath/cover.htm .
» This book of family-friendly numeracy activities is ready to use in early literacy programs, day care centres, primary grades and Adult programs. Patterns, recipes, and hand-outs all included for the entire family to share.

Family math groups: an exploration of content and style. (Online)
Kate Nonesuch. Duncan, BC: Vancouver Island University, 2009.
www.nald.ca/library/research/fammatgro/fammatgro.pdf
» This literature review outlines the relationship of family math and family literacy, explores the importance of play in developing early skills, and traces the development of mathematical skills in early childhood.

Get set learn: everything you need to run a family literacy program. (Online)
By Lorri Sauve. Kitchener, ON: Project READ Literacy Network, 2008.
www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/gsl/curriculum/curriculum.pdf
Get set learn: parent book. (Online) Lorri Sauve. Kitchener, ON: Project READ Literacy Network, 2008. Available online at http://www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/gsl/workbook/workbook.pdf
» “Get Set Learn” is a family literacy program that focuses on both parents and their children. This program stresses the importance of reading to your child on a daily basis, engaging in literacy play and being a literacy role model.

Get set learn afterschool program: everything you need to run a program for families.
Ann Kelland and Alison Wasielewski. Kitchener, ON: Project READ Literacy Network Waterloo-Wellington, 2011.
» The Get Set Learn Afterschool Program is a family literacy program designed for school-aged children (6 to 12 years of age) and their families. It is designed as a 10 week afterschool program for parents whose Essential Skills are at Levels 1 and 2. During the once a week, 2 hour classes, families do collective literacy and math activities, and then separately children do age-appropriate math and literacy activities, while parents learn research-based practical strategies and tips for supporting their children’s learning.

Getting dads on board: fostering literacy partnerships for successful student learning.
By Jane Baskwill. Markham, Ont.: Pembroke, c2009.
» Offers strategies for attracting, recruiting, and keeping fathers involved in their children’s literacy learning. The book illustrates how a father’s interests and strengths can enrich a child’s learning. Intended for teachers who want to get and keep dads on board with their children’s learning.

Growing into literacy: train the facilitator manual and DVD (Rev. Ed.).
By William T. Fagan and Mary C. Cronin. St. John’s, NL: Memorial University of Newfoundland PRINTS Program, 2007 and 2008.
» The DVD and manual are designed to help facilitators develop understanding, competence and expertise necessary to work with parents, teachers and other interested people.

Hand in hand from A to Z: a family literacy program.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» A research-based program intended for families with children up to 4 years of age. Its goal is to support families in their efforts to foster the overall development of their children and their emergent literacy skills. It involves five areas of research: emergent reading and writing, early family intervention, the ecological approach, primary prevention, and partnership. Includes the following resources:

  • Checklist for parents. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • Communication plan for emergent literacy. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • Emergent literacy training. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • First steps in reading and writing. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • Hand in hand: emergent literacy from a to z. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • Play workshops. See complete description under Early Learning.
  • Sharing pictures and words: introduction to the program. See complete description under Early Learning.

Helping families learn is everyone’s business: an employers’ guide to family literacy in the workplace. By Sharon Skage. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy, 2010. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/cffl/helping_employer/helping_employer.pdf
» Outlines factors for employers to consider before starting a family literacy project, and gives examples of workplace family literacy programs.

Helping families learn is everyone’s business: a practitioner’s guide to family literacy in the workplace.
By Sharon Skage. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy, 2010. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/cffl/helping_practitioner/helping_practitioner.pdf
» This document, a companion to the one above, describes a process to allow family literacy organizations and businesses to become partners in delivering literacy programs. Sections on good practice in workplace family literacy programs, partnering with business, planning a program, and program delivery are included.

Home, school, and community collaboration: culturally responsive family engagement. 2nd ed.
Kathy B. Grant, Julie A. Ray. Thousand Oaks: SAGE, 2012.
» This comprehensive textbook uses the culturally responsive family support model to examine working effectively with diverse families in early childhood and elementary education. Written by experts from a number of perspectives, it includes research-based information and strategies to help teachers understand, appreciate, and support diverse families, as well as promote family engagement.

I love when we count. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2008.
» Designed for parents, this DVD emphasizes the importance of family in developing children’s numeracy skills. Experts offer recommendations on easy activities that parents can do to promote numeracy in children from birth to seven years of age.

I love when we talk. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2010.
» Shows parents how talking with children strengthens their communication skills, builds their confidence, and provides a solid base for literacy and learning.

I love when you read. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media Inc., 2007.
» This DVD features children and their parents engaged in easy, age-appropriate activities that support literacy and encourage a love of reading. Narrative by experts is included. This is especially effective at bringing literacy information to parents and caregivers with low literacy skills.

Implementing family literacy programs for linguistically and culturally diverse populations: key elements to consider. (Online)
By Delia C. Garcia and Deborah J. Hasson. School Community Journal, v 14, n 1, p. 113-137, Spri-Sum 2004.
www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/EJ794831.pdf
» This article examines key elements for effective implementation of family literacy programs for parents of school children. Includes the role of needs assessments, recruitment and retention, curriculum design and materials, staffing, and interagency collaboration.

Improving primary literacy.
Edited by Anthony Feiler et al. New York: Routledge, 2007.
» This book demonstrates ways in which home and school literacy learning can be linked. It includes tried and tested practical activities from Great Britain.

Language and literacy: from birth… for life: research summary.
By Rachael Millard and Michelle Waese. [Ottawa, ON]: Canadian Language & Literacy Research Network, 2007.
» This resource kit is based on the latest research into how young children develop the ability to use language and to read and write. Child care practitioners play a vital role in fostering language and literacy skills. The kit is comprised of a summary of current research on language and literacy development in young children, and a CD-ROM featuring workshops, interviews and video clips of effective practice techniques.

L.A.P.S., literacy and parenting skills: Program materials

  • Aboriginal literacy and parenting skills (A.-L.A.P.S.): facilitators’ guide & participants’ material. By Laureen MacKenzie and Elaine Cairns. Calgary, AB: Bow Valley College, 1998.
    » A program designed for people with an Aboriginal background who may need help in assisting their children’s literacy development and who may wish to talk about their parenting strategies.
  • Activity 2: a fresh look: children’s language and literacy development, LAPS: Literacy and Parenting Skills.
    Calgary, AB.: Further Education Society, 2008.
    » Explores children’s resources used in LAPS programs. Rhymes, songs, games and other activities have been augmented into each LAPS session, in addition to valuable information based on the latest research on brain development and language and literacy acquisition in parents and young children.
  • English as a second language: literacy and parenting skills (LAPS/ESL): facilitators’ guide and participants’ material.
    By Elaine Cairns and Laureen MacKenzie. Calgary, AB: Alberta Vocational College, 1996.
    » This program is designed for people from other cultures, to help facilitate their family’s adjustment to Canada.
  • Literacy and parenting skills (L.A.P.S): facilitator’s guide and participants’ materials.
    Written by Laureen Mackenzie. Calgary, AB: Alberta Vocational College, 1996.
    » L.A.P.S. is a collaborative effort to meet the needs of those who wish to improve their literacy skills. This is the complete program, including facilitator’s guide and materials for participants.

LEAP BC activity cards. (Online)
Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2009. Downloadable cards detailing activities to promote early literacy, oral communication, physical activity and healthy eating for young children. Cards are available for download within the LEAP program they accompany: decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/. Click on each program to find downloadable cards for Move, Hop, Talk and Food Flair. Cards are also available in french at grandir.decoda.ca

Learning to talk and listen: an oral language resource for early childhood caregivers. (Online)
Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2010.
lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/LearningtoTalkandListen.pdf
» Summarizes research findings on the relationship between young children’s oral language skills and later reading achievement, and suggests what this means for early literacy practices to promote children’s language development.

Learning with grandparents: grandparents and schools working together to support basic skills development.
Ian Gyllenspetz. London: Basic Skills Agency, 2006.
» This guide highlights four examples of schools supporting grandparents’ involvement in helping their young grandchildren develop basic literacy and numeracy skills. The projects are varied and include a multilingual grandparenting project. Offers suggestions for good practice.

Let’s read together: improving literacy outcomes with the adult-child interactive reading inventory (ACIRI).
By Andrea DeBruin-Parecki. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 2007.
» Based on reading research and extensively field tested, this manual offers a method of evaluating the behaviours that promote quality adult-child interactive reading. In addition, a large selection of tips and activities to reinforce interactive reading is included.

LINC-parenting program: manual and curriculum guidelines.
Developed by Toronto District School Board, 2000. Also available online at wiki.settlementatwork.org/wiki/LINC_Parenting_Program:_Manual_and_Curriculum_Guidelines
» The LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada) Parenting delivery model was designed specifically for newcomers with infants and young children. LINC parents learn English by participating in parent/child activities and guided group discussions about the development and behaviour of their children.

Linking 1-2-3 and A-B-C: all about numeracy and literacy.
Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy, 2007.
» Adults and children will both benefit from the addition of numeracy activities to family literacy programs. This manual provides information and support for early numeracy development to parents, and to the caregivers and early education specialists who support them in this role.

Literacy Plus +: a practitioner’s guide to adding adult literacy activities to family service programs.
By Bonnie Soroke, M.A.; Edited by Kate Nonesuch. Vancouver, BC: HIPPY Canada, 2008.
» This guide outlines the process of embedding an adult literacy component within a home-based family service program. For organizations and practitioners who work with children and families and want to provide more opportunities for parents.

Monitoring tools: adult goal progress chart: family literacy programs in the Fraser Valley (Online)
Developed by Pam Auffray and Penny Petersen. Vancouver, BC: RiPAL, 2006.
www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/groundup/mtagpc/cover.htm
» This document describes two tools developed in British Columbia to monitor progress and measure outcomes in learner-centred family literacy programs. They are designed to help learners as well as practitioners monitor their progress towards learner chosen goals.

PALS family literacy resource.
Jim Anderson and Fiona Morrison. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2010.
» Parents as Literacy Supporters (PALS) is a culturally responsive family literacy program for parents/caregivers and their preschool and kindergarten children. This resource offers a framework for developing a family literacy program based on learning through play. Each of the 10 sessions described in this resource contains key ideas, a session overview, resource suggestions, suggested learning centres and supporting teaching materials. Designed to be used in conjunction with training in the PALS program.

Parenting for academic success: teacher’s resource manual.
By Janet M. Fulton, et al. Louisville, KY: National Center for Family Literacy, 2005.
» This 12 unit curriculum is designed for parents who are non-native speakers of English with children in kindergarten through grade three. It builds parents’ English language skills and increases their ability to support their children’s language and literacy development. The 12 parent workbooks that accompany this curriculum are also available as a separate resource.

Parenting your teen.
Ann McLean; edited by Laureen MacKenzie and Elaine Cairns. Calgary: Further Education Society of Alberta, 2004.
» This resource contains a facilitator’s guide and handouts. It has been developed to be used either in conjunction with the main LAPS manuals or it may be used as a complete program on its own for those parents whose primary focus is dealing with teenagers. Topics include Understanding Changes (teenagers are going through), Building a Teen’s Self-Esteem, Communicating with a Teenager, Dealing with Anger: Yours and Theirs, and Families as Teams. Literacy activities related to each of the topics are included in each session.

Parents reading, children succeeding: family literacy program.
By Betty Knight. Invermere, BC: Columbia Basin Alliance for Literacy, 2005. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/paread/cover.htm
» The “Parents Reading, Children Succeeding” program is designed primarily for parents of children three to five years old. In the parent portion of the program, parents share ideas and activities that will help them support the learning and emergent literacy skill development of their preschool children. In the children’s portion, parents and children participate in a safe, fun program of activities that support and encourage learning.

Preparing children for success in school and life: 20 ways to increase your child’ brain power.
Marcia L. Tate.   Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin, 2011.
» Written for parents, this book shows how to help children’s brains develop in everyday ways.  Includes practical tips and tools for creating a calm and brain-compatible home environment, incorporating positive physical contact and verbal communication, encouraging play that develops creativity and imagination, and strengthening children’s auditory, tactile, kinesthetic, and visual modes of learning.  The text is not literacy level.  Lots of good information for practitioners to share with parents.

Promising practices in family literacy programs. (Online)
By Maureen Sanders and Janet Shively.
www.en.copian.ca/library/research/ppflp/cover.htm
» This article is organized around five statements of principle that are the basis of promising practice in family literacy. Brief examples of programs implementing these principles are described. While not comprehensive it gives an overview of the variety of family literacy work done in Canada.

School, family and community partnerships: your handbook for action. 3rd ed.
Joyce L. Epstein et al. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press, 2009.
» This book presents coordinated strategies, including a framework, guidelines, and tools, for schools to use in establishing, strengthening and sustaining partnerships for student success with parents and the community.   Written from an American perspective.

Sharing our gifts: build skills together and create a family scrapbook.
Jinny Greaves et al. Charlottetown, PE: PEI Literacy Alliance, 2012. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/peilitall/sharing_gifts_parents_guide/sharing_gifts_parents_guide.pdf
This project was designed to help parents create an atmosphere of learning in the home and, at the same time, make a scrapbook the family can enjoy and add to over time. This guide teaches families how to identify their strengths, set goals and make plans for family activities. At each step families practice some of the nine Essential Skills. Families are encouraged to collect artifacts of their activities and put them into a family scrapbook. Tips for collecting artifacts from family activities and suggested resources for further reading are included. A facilitator’s guide is available separately from the library or online www.nald.ca/library/learning/peilitall/sharing_gifts_parents_guide/sharing_gifts_parents_guide.pdf .

StrongStart BC. (DVD)
British Columbia: Ministry of Education, 2008.
» Designed for parents and caregivers of preschool children, this DVD tours StrongStart centres in Riverview Park Elementary School and Bridgeview Elementary School as examples of learning environments and activities in StrongStart programs. StrongStart is a BC government sponsored, free, drop-in early learning program for preschoolers accompanied by a parent or caregiver. More information about the StrongStart program is available online. www.bced.gov.bc.ca/early_learning/strongstart_bc/

Upgrading for parents with pre-schoolers. (Website)
By Rose Strohmaier, Anne Jackson and Catherine Owen. Kingston, ON: Kingston Literacy, 2008.
www.klandskills.ca/famlit/upp_site/upp_intro.html
» This program contains activities grouped into a series of practical parenting topics including healthy eating, fitness, and budgeting. Suitable for adults at LBS 2-3. The UPP program develops parenting strategies and Essential skills.

to top


Parent Materials

Babies love books: a guide for grown-ups.
By Catherine and Laurence Anholt.
» This story for parents of babies or very young children, or any adult who is around babies, emphasizes the importance of reading to babies at a very early age. It is part of the BC Books for Babies program.

Checklist for parents: hand in hand from a to z!.
Quebec: Government of Quebec, Ministry of Education, 2004.
» A program for developing parenting skills and early intervention strategies. Intended for the parents of newborns. Contains handouts and checklists for parents

A child becomes a reader: proven ideas for research for parents: birth through preschool. 3rd ed. (Online)
Bonnie B. Armbruster, Fran Lehr & Jean Osborn. Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2006. T
lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/reading_pre.pdf
» Written for parents, grandparents and other caregivers, this booklet gives ideas for simple games and activities that will help children develop the skills to become good readers and writers later in life.

Dad’s playbook: coaching kids to read. (Online)
Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2006.
Available online at lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/Dads_Playbook.pdf
» Outlines five skills children need to become readers and 20 fathers tell how they help their kids learn to read.

Every child ready to read: literacy tips for parents.
The Lee Pesky Learning Center. New York: Ballantine, 2004.
» A reference book for parents of infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Topics includes read-aloud books to develop sound awareness, picture books to encourage letter knowledge, ways to promote verbal language, the benefits of symbolic play, fun games for car trips, helping children ‘write’ at home, and warning signs of learning disabilities.

First steps: a resource handbook on oral language and literacy development for caregivers.
By Ruth Hayden and Maureen Sanders. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy. 2003.
» This handbook is designed to help caregivers increase children’s opportunities to use language and to be involved with reading and writing events while they are under your care.

Get ready for school! Caregiver’s guide, DVD and interactive CD-ROM.
From TVOKids. [Toronto, ON]: Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO), 2009.
» The kit is intended to help parents and caregivers prepare preschool children for their first school experience. The DVD contains 6 videos for children and their parents. The CD-ROM contains games and activities. Complete versions of CD-ROM games and DVD videos are available online at http://www.tvokids.com/activities/getreadyschool

Help your child to read and write.
Fiona Chandler, illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas and Ruth Russell. London: Usborne, 2008.
» A combination of easy-to-read text, step-by-step instructions, and appealing illustrations. Filled with activities, games and advice on how to support a child’s learning to read and write from birth to age seven.

Help your child to read and write: it’s as easy as ABC.
Ricki Goldstein Shlien. Montreal: Ricki Goldstein Shlien, 2007.
» This booklet is geared to parents. It offers encouraging suggestions for parents to help their children read and write – one for each letter of the alphabet.

Hop: healthy opportunities for preschoolers: Leap BC family resource.
By Viviene Anne Temple and Allison Preece. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2007. Available online at decoda.ca/wp-content/files_flutter/1314125129HOP_resource.pdf
» Written for parents and other caregivers, this book offers a variety of play activities to stimulate healthy development in children 3 to 5 years old. The activities are simple and enjoyable, and promote physical activity, literacy and healthy eating.  Activity cards are available online at  decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/hop/

I love when we count. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2008.
» Designed for parents, this DVD emphasizes the importance of family in developing children’s numeracy skills. Experts offer recommendations on easy activities that parents can do to promote numeracy in children from birth to seven years of age.

I love when we talk. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media, Inc., 2010.
» Shows parents how talking with children strengthens their communication skills, builds their confidence, and provides a solid base for literacy and learning.

I love when you read. (DVD)
Directed and edited by Leah Tremain. Campbell River, BC: Tremain Media Inc., 2007.
» This DVD features children and their parents engaged in easy, age-appropriate activities that support literacy and encourage a love of reading. Narrative by experts is included. This is especially effective at bringing literacy information to parents and caregivers with low literacy skills.

Learning through play: from birth to three years. Rev. ed.
Toronto, ON: The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, 2009.
» Designed for parents, this concise, illustrated calendar looks at play activities that are fun and encourage learning at different age levels from birth to three years.  The activities are divided into five areas of development: sense of self, physical, relationships, understanding and communication.  It stresses the importance of learning through play.

Learning through play: from three to six years.
Toronto, ON: The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, 2009.
» Designed for parents, this concise, illustrated calendar looks at play activities that are fun and encourage learning at different age levels from three to six years of age.  The activities are divided into five areas of development: sense of self, physical, relationships, understanding and communication.  It stresses the importance of learning through play.

Move: move with me from birth to three.
By Rebecca Milne Frechette. Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2007. Also available online at decoda.ca/wp-content/files_flutter/1314654080MOVE_resource.pdf
» Written for parents and other caregivers, this book includes activities to use with children from birth to three years of age. The activities are designed to promote physical movement while incorporating early language and literacy development and healthy eating

Preparing children for success in school and life: 20 ways to increase your child’ brain power.
Marcia L. Tate.   Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin, 2011.
» Written for parents, this book shows how to help children’s brains develop in everyday ways.  Includes practical tips and tools for creating a calm and brain-compatible home environment, incorporating positive physical contact and verbal communication, encouraging play that develops creativity and imagination, and strengthening children’s auditory, tactile, kinesthetic, and visual modes of learning.  The text is not literacy level.

Raising confident readers: how to teach your child to read and write – from baby to age seven.
By Dr. J. Richard Gentry. Cambridge: Da Capo LifeLong, 2010.
» Written for parents of young children, this book offers at-home activities to develop literacy. The activities and recommendations are grouped into five phases depending on the child’s age and development.

Read to me! A month by month guide to reading with your baby in the first year.
Shandra LaRamee-Jones, Carol McDougall, Pam Mahar and Tracy Lowe. Halifax, NS: Nimbus Publishing, 2010.
» Using a calendar format, this guide provides monthly tips, book suggestions and rhymes for each month of a baby’s first year, catering to the baby’s developing skills.

Reading for families: helping your child with reading at home. (DVD)
By Read Now BC. Victoria, BC: British Columbia Ministry of Education, 2008.
» This DVD shows how six families in BC fit reading and literacy activities into their busy days. Early childhood education experts comment on how parents and caregivers can help young children develop a lifelong love of books and literacy. The material is divided into three chapters organized by age: infancy to age three, three to five year olds, five to eight year olds. This DVD would be of interest to parents of young children and those working with parents.

Ready, set, learn: helping your preschooler get ready for school. (Online)
ReadNowBC. Victoria, BC: British Columbia Ministry of Education, 2009. Available online at
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/early_learning/rsl/2009/rsl_english09.pdf
» Written for parents, this resource gives information about typical development of a preschooler and ideas for activities to support early learning. Translations are available online at http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/early_learning/rsl/ .

The road to reading : early steps to help children become readers. (DVD)
Produced and directed by Kem Murch. London, Ont.: London Investment in Education Council and Kem Murch Productions, 1998.
» Designed for parents, this DVD demonstrates everyday activities that parents can use at home to encourage literacy. Suggestions are offered by parents, childcare experts, teachers and librarians. “Many strategies are presented, and the emphasis is on variety, constancy and enjoyment.”

Sharing our gifts: build skills together and create a family scrapbook.
Jinny Greaves et al. Charlottetown, PE: PEI Literacy Alliance, 2012. Also available online at www.en.copian.ca/library/learning/peilitall/sharing_gifts_parents_guide/sharing_gifts_parents_guide.pdf
This project was designed to help parents create an atmosphere of learning in the home and, at the same time, make a scrapbook the family can enjoy and add to over time. This guide teaches families how to identify their strengths, set goals and make plans for family activities. At each step families practice some of the nine Essential Skills. Families are encouraged to collect artifacts of their activities and put them into a family scrapbook. Tips for collecting artifacts from family activities and suggested resources for further reading are included. A facilitator’s guide is available separately from the library or online www.nald.ca/library/learning/peilitall/sharing_gifts_parents_guide/sharing_gifts_parents_guide.pdf

Talk activity cards. Leap BC. (Online)
Vancouver, BC: 2010 Legacies Now, 2010.
decoda.ca/children-families/leap-bc/talk/page/8/#t
» Talk™ activity cards are a series of 40 illustrated cards with activities encouraging learning through play, and early literacy and oral language development. These activities are designed for families, caregivers or early learning practitioners to enjoy with children from birth to 5 years.

Teaching parents how to teach.
By Jill & David Whitehouse. Vancouver, BC: Early Minds Education, Inc., 2008.
» Based on a multi-sensory approach, this book provides information on how to teach and examples of exercises and activities that support a child’s learning in language arts and math skills. It is designed for parents with Preschool to Grade 2 children. Clear explanation of activities and worksheets are included.

You make the difference in helping your child learn.
By Ayala Manolson. Toronto, ON: Hanen Early Language Program, 2007.
» In clear language, this book offers practical suggestions for parents and caregivers about interacting with children in a supportive way that encourages learning. A limited amount of text on each page is accompanied by colourful illustrations and cartoons.

to top

Last updated: October 2012