Reading as an essential skill refers to the ability to read text in the form of sentences and paragraphs, whether printed or electronic, as simple text or within forms, graphs and charts. The following materials are for educators, tutors, practitioners and anyone who is interested in the Essential Skill of reading in adult literacy. Every item on this list is available, either from the library or online.


Assessment

Assessment strategies and reading profiles (ASRP). (Online)
http://lincs.ed.gov/readingprofiles/index.htm
Rosalind Davidson, Jon Strucker, Steve Quann and Sally Waldron. Literacy Information and Communication System, 2009.
» This website, intended for ABE and ASE teachers, explains the components of reading, outlines reading profiles, has videos of diagnostic reading tests being administered, has links to free tests with directions for use, and provides suggestions for instruction.

Canadian adult reading assessment (CARA). Instructor’s manual and CD-ROM.
Pat M. Campbell and Flo M. Brokop. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2000.
» CARA can be used for placement or diagnosis. As a placement tool, CARA will enable you to identify the individual’s independent, instructional and frustration reading levels. When used as a diagnostic tool, CARA enables you to identify an individual’s reading level. CARA includes narrative and informational passages at all levels of reading so that comparisons can be made in how a student reads these different genres.

Canadian adult reading assessment (CARA). Student’s assessment booklet.
Pat M. Campbell and Flo M. Brokop. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2000.
» CARA is an informal reading inventory developed specifically for Canadian students and educators. This book contains the student readings to be used with the instructor’s manual for this reading assessment tool. Readings are organized by level.

Canadian language benchmarks: literacy placement tool: volume 1: foundation and phase 1.
Ottawa, ON: Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2005.
» The Literacy Placement Tool (LPT) is intended to be used by practitioners and instructors as a tool for administering, scoring, recording and reporting the results of LPT assessments in adult ESL programs. The first volume is designed to help identify adult ESL learners who might benefit from placement into an ESL literacy class.

Canadian language benchmarks: literacy placement tool: volume 2: phase 2.
Ottawa, ON : Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2006.
» The second volume is designed to help assessors, workplace trainers and literacy practitioners to make informed decisions about an adult ESL literacy client’s literacy needs.

Community Adult Literacy Benchmarks: Reading. Revised ed. (Online)
Vancouver, BC: Decoda Literacy Solutions, 2013.
http://decoda.ca/adults/community-literacy-benchmarks/reading/
» This is the tool used in British Columbia to measure the reading progress of adult literacy learners in community literacy programs.

Diagnostic adult learning assessment for beginning readers (DALA).
Pat Campbell. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2010.
» DALA is a user-friendly reading assessment for beginning adult readers. It measures a student’s knowledge of environmental print, text functions, print concepts and conventions, letter names, phonemic awareness (beginning sounds and rhymes), high frequency words, phonics, alphabetic principle and literacy practices. The DVD included in the kit demonstrates the use of the tools.

Read forward: user guide.
Audrey Gardner. Calgary, AB: Bow Valley College, 2011.
» Based on IALS, this resource contains tests that measure incremental improvement in document and prose reading. The tests are based on everyday reading and are applicable to diverse audiences. Training videos are available online http://blogs.bowvalleycollegeweb.com/adultreadingassessment/training/

Reading indicator: a guide for employees and employees. (Online)
http://en.copian.ca/library/learning/oles/reading/reading.pdf
Ottawa, ON: Human Resources and Social Development Canada, 2005.
» This tool indicates reading skills levels by providing examples of assessment questions. The questions duplicate actual workplace tasks performed in a variety of occupations, but don’t require specialized knowledge. Instructions for both employers and employees are included.

Reading self-assessment. (Online)
http://en.copian.ca/library/learning/assessment/reading_self_assessment/reading_self_assessment.pdf
Ottawa, ON: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009.
» A brief checklist to determine reading strengths and areas for improvement.

SAM, Summative assessment manual for teachers. Volumes 1 & 2:
Canadian Language Benchmarks 1-4.

Developed by Grazyna Pawlikowska-Smith. Ottawa, ON : Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2007.
» These manuals serve as a tool for ESL teachers to assess achievement in adult ESL students whose reading/writing difficulties do not arise from their literacy needs in their first language.

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Dyslexia & Reading Disabilities

Deciphering dyslexia. (DVD)
Knowledge Network. Canada: NFB, 2008.
» This documentary is designed to raise awareness and provide an understanding of dyslexia. By profiling 4 individuals and their families, it illustrates likely causes and scientifically sound strategies for intervention.

Dyslexia: a practitioner’s handbook.
Gavin Reid. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons, 2009.
» Written for educators, this updated handbook contains comprehensive information and recommended practices based on recent research findings.

Dyslexia: action plans for successful learning, a practical guide to learning disabilities.
Glynis Hannell. Minnetonka, MN: Peytral Publications, 2004.
» This resource, for classroom teachers and parents, is written with both children and adults in mind.

Dyslexia in the digital age: making IT work.
Ian Smythe. New York: Continuum, 2010.
Dyslexia in the digital age: making IT work. Ian Smythe. New York: Continuum, 2010.
» Using technology to support dyslexic individuals is the topic of this book. It does not recommend specific software or hardware, but instead gives basic information to help individuals make informed choices.

The dyslexic adult: interventions and outcomes: an evidence-based approach. 2nd ed. David McLoughlin and Carol Leather. Chichester, UK: BPS Blackwell, 2013.
» This book provides information and resources on ways that dyslexic adults can be supported in training, education and employment, including a guide to assessments that can be conducted. Written as a guide for psychologists, specialist tutors, teachers, coaches and human resource personnel.

The gift of dyslexia: why some of the smartest people can’t read … and how they can learn. Ronald D. Davis. New York: Penguin, 1997.
» This book describes how learning differs for dyslexic individuals and presents methods for overcoming the difficulties of dyslexia.

Overcoming dyslexia: a new and complete science-based program for reading problems at any level. Sally Shaywitz. New York: Knopf, 2003.
» After reviewing the nature of reading and dyslexia, this book looks at diagnosing dyslexia, including a section on diagnosing bright young adults. It then discusses what can be done to help develop reading skill. While this is largely focused on children, there is a section on helping adults become better readers. A chapter on accommodations is followed by short biographies of successful, well known adults who are dyslexic.

Proust and the squid: the story and science of the reading brain. 1st ed.
Maryanne Wolf. NY: Harper, 2007.
» A developmental psychologist evaluates the ways in which reading and writing have transformed the human brain. Examines how the brain learns to read and the reading difficulties and gifts created by dyslexia.

Reading and dyslexia in different orthographies.
Edited by Nicola Brunswick, Siné McDougall, Paul De Mornay Davies. New York: Psychology Press, 2010.
» This book presents cross-language comparisons of reading development and developmental dyslexia in alphabetic and non-alphabetic languages. It begins by looking at development of language skills in monolingual speakers and bilingual children learning to read in languages with different spelling-sound rules. The next section covers developmental dyslexia in monolingual and bilingual speakers, and the impact of differences in orthography on symptoms. The final section looks at how the brain deals with different languages and writing systems.

Reading development and difficulties.
Kate Cain. Chichester: BPS Blackwell/John Wiley, 2010.
» Demonstrates that reading relies on development of both good word reading skills and the ability to extract meaning from text. Examines specific problems underlying reading difficulties in children with developmental dyslexia and children with poor reading comprehension. Includes information on assessment and instruction.

Teaching reading comprehension to students with learning difficulties.
Janette K. Klingner, Sharon Vaughn, Alison Boardman. New York: Guilford Press, 2007.
» Written for teachers whose students have reading difficulties, this offers research-based recommendations on assessment, vocabulary instruction, and practices to promote comprehension before, during, and after reading.

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Research

Adult education literacy instruction: a review of the research. (Online)
http://en.copian.ca/library/research/adult_lit_instruction/adult_lit_instruction.pdf
John R. Kruidenier, Charles A. MacArthur and Heide S. Wrigley. Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2010.
» This report identifies and evaluates research on adult reading instruction and summarizes scientifically based findings. The major aspects of reading instruction identified are: assessment of reading ability, alphabetics instruction including phonemic awareness and word analysis, fluency instruction, and vocabulary and comprehension instruction.

Improving adult literacy instruction: developing reading and writing. (Online)
http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=13468&page=1
Alan M. Lesgold and Melissa Welch-Ross, eds. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012.
» Based on the report of the National Research Council, Improving Adult Literacy Instruction: Options for Practice and Research, this document presents an overview of what is known about how literacy develops reading and writing and the practices that are effective for developing them.

Learning literacy in Canada: evidence from the International Survey of Reading Skills. (Online)
http://en.copian.ca/library/research/stats/llc/llc.pdf
S. Grenier et al. Ottawa, ON: Statistics Canada 2008.
» Based on data from the International Study of Reading Skills, this report describes the reading abilities of the least-skilled adult readers in Canada and identifies their basic reading profile based on their strengths and needs in reading.

Phonetics for phonics: underpinning knowledge for adult literacy practitioners. Maxine Burton. Leicester: NIACE, 2011.
» Background information on phonetics written for adult literacy practitioners. Includes a rationale for phonics as a strategy, why phonetics matter for phonics, the basic principles of English phonetics and phonology, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Information on linking phonetics knowledge to classroom teaching is based on the British Adult Literacy Core Curriculum but the details make it useful in other contexts.

Proust and the squid: the story and science of the reading brain. 1st ed.
Maryanne Wolf. NY: Harper, 2007.
» A developmental psychologist evaluates the ways in which reading and writing have transformed the human brain. Examines how the brain learns to read and the reading difficulties and gifts created by dyslexia.

Reading and adult English language learners: a review of the research.
Miriam Burt, Joy Kreeft Peyton, Rebecca Adams. Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics, 2003.
Also available online at http://www.cal.org/caela/research/RAELL.pdf
» “The purpose of this paper is to give practitioners, graduate students, researchers, and policy makers information about what is known about how adult English language learners learn to read in English, what types of activities facilitate this process, and what research still needs to be done.” p.5

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Teaching Techniques

Adult basic literacy tutor training workshop: Unit 2: Teaching reading to adults. (Online)
http://adultliteracytutor3.blogspot.ca/
Richmond, VA: Virginia Adult Learning Resource Center.
» This section of an online tutor training workshop introduces the basics of helping an adult learn to read in 12 modules, designed to take about 3 hours to complete.

Adult reading toolkit: a research-based resource for adult literacy. 5th ed. Margaret (Marn) Frank, Victoria Weinberg et al. Minneapolis, Minn. LDA of Minnesota, 2007.
» The ART includes six chapters covering phonemic awareness, beginning phonics skills, intermediate decoding, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Each chapter includes background information, assessment ideas, instruction activities, use of authentic materials, recommended curricula and software and references. Six toolkits of reproducible assessment and instructional activities follow. Appendices include tools for informal assessments and instructional activities, study materials, and lesson plan organizers.

Applying research in reading instruction for adults: first steps for teachers. (Online)
http://lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/applyingresearch.pdf
Susan McShane. Louisville, KY: National Center for Family Literacy, 2005.
» This book provides guidance to practitioners on how to plan and deliver reading instruction in adult education. It reviews the components of reading instruction and reading assessment practices. It includes ideas for assessing, planning, and providing instruction in each reading component with specific examples and resources.

Catching readers before they fall: supporting readers who struggle, K-4.
Pat Johnson and Katie Keier. Portland, Me: Stenhouse Publishers, 2010.
» “Every teacher of reading plays a vital role in helping to catch those readers for whom learning to read does not come easily. If you have ever been at a loss for what to say and do when confronted with a child who struggles, this book is for you. Using examples from both adults and children, the authors explain and describe the complex integrated network of strategies that takes place in the minds of proficient readers–strategies that struggling readers have to learn in order to construct their own reading processes. The examples and scenarios of teacher/student interactions in Catching Readers Before They Fall provide a sense of how it looks and what it sounds like to teach strategic actions to struggling readers.” – Back Cover

Classroom strategies for interactive learning. 3rd ed.
Doug Buehl. Newark, Del.: International Reading Association, 2009.
» Features 45 teaching strategies that integrate comprehension instruction into content instruction.

Explaining reading: a resource for teaching concepts, skills, and strategies. 2nd ed.
Gerald G. Duffy. New York: Guilford Press, 2009.
» This book on explicit reading instruction describes 23 skills and strategies associated with vocabulary, comprehension, word recognition and fluency. A large part of the book offers ways to explain each skill or strategy, based on real-world examples. While this book was written for teachers with struggling K-8 learners, the explanations can be adapted for use with adults.

Frontier College tutor’s guide: working with adults.
Toronto: Frontier College Press, 2011.
» This revised tutor’s guide is divided into three main section: an introduction to Frontier College’s approach and general information such as learning styles, goal setting, and setting boundaries; detailed strategies and activities that tutors may use when working with beginner and intermediate level students; and information on working with specific populations such as street youth, prison inmates, people with disabilities, and English language learners.

A guide for tutoring adult literacy students. Rev. ed.
Prepared by Joyce Cameron with Myrna Rabinowitz; revised by Paula Davies. Victoria: BC Ministry of Advanced Education, Training and Technology, 2000.
» This revised edition offers more activities and strategies to meet the needs of higher-level literacy students — a reflection of the changing profile of participants in literacy programs. Readings and references have been updated. Attempts have been made to incorporate specific requests for the inclusion of new material on such topics as: pre-reading strategies, multi-sensory tools, a method for calculating readability levels, ice breaker activities, tutor-student safety concerns and setting personal boundaries.

Helping students identify their reading goals. (Online)
http://www.proliteracyednet.org/downloads/236ReadingGoals.pdf
ProLiteracy Worldwide, 2007.

How the brain learns to read.
David Sousa. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press, 2014.
» Based on neuroscientific research, this book looks at how children learn to read and offers practical reading strategies for the K-12 classroom. It includes recognizing and overcoming reading problems, including early intervention.

How to teach students to read and spell sight words. (Online)
http://www.proliteracyednet.org/downloads/210SightWords.pdf
ProLiteracy America Information Center.
» Tips for tutors to teach sight words using the sense of touch as well as seeing and hearing. Particularly helpful for those who are kinesthetic learners.

Ideas, activities and exercises for fundamental level English.
Laurie Gould and Jan Weiten. Victoria, BC: Ministry of Education, Skills and Training, 1997.
» This book offers ideas for instruction in reading, writing and math to the end of the Grade 8 level. The activities and exercises are designed for adults over 18 who can speak English.

Improving reading: phonics and fluency: practitioner guide. (Online)
http://www.nrdc.org.uk/publications_details.asp?ID=156#
Maxine Burton et al. London, UK: NRDC, 2008.
» This guide looks at phonics and oral reading fluency in practice and suggests resources and ideas for classroom use.

In a reading state of mind: brain research, teacher modeling, and comprehension instruction. (Book + DVD)
» Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, and Diane Lapp. Newark, Del.: International Reading Association, 2009.
» Combining reading, comprehension and neuroscience, this book reviews what happens in the brain as a person reads and explains how a teacher can effectively model comprehension and word solving strategies. Also includes how to use text structures and text features to learn and retain information. The DVD has examples of teacher modelling in classrooms.

Interactive think-aloud lessons: 25 surefire ways to engage student and improve comprehension. Lori Oczkus. New York: Scholastic, 2009.
» Classroom-tested lessons that will aid in teaching comprehension strategies–connect, predict/infer, question, summarize, monitor/clarify, and evaluate–through a variety of modalities. Interactive think alouds engage students during the modeling phase of the lesson with gestures to cue the strategies and characters and metaphors that students can relate to the strategies. The DVD offers additional support. Written for K-5 teachers, but ideas may be adapted.

Literacy tutor’s guide: reading for meaning and the writing experience. 3rd ed. Edmonton, AB: Centre for Family Literacy, 2006.
» This concise guide is divided into two sections. The section on reading explores the reading process and gives helpful strategies for beginning readers.

Multisensory teaching of basic language skills. 2nd ed.
Judith R. Birsh, ed.
Baltimore, MD: P.H. Brookes, 2005.
» This reference book looks at how to use multisensory teaching approaches to help students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities develop skills in areas including phonological awareness, fluency, comprehension, composition, letter knowledge, spelling, handwriting and math. Mainly written for K-12 teachers, includes chapter on working with high functioning adult dyslexics.

READ: seventy strategies to support reading success.
Kimberly Kimbell-Lopez, Carrice Cummins. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2010.
» Techniques and strategies for literacy instruction based on phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, oral language and writing. Identifies the READ of each strategy – rationale, explanation, application and delivery.

Reading. Developing adult teaching and learning: practitioner guides.
Maxine Burton. Leicester: NIACE, 2007.
» Guidelines for teaching reading to adults based on research and practitioner experience.

Reading at work: workplace reader.
Lynda Fownes, Vanya Wong, Corinne Volpatti. Burnaby, BC: SkillPlan, 2005.
Reading at work: facilitator’s guide: companion to the workplace reader.
Jean Tonski. Burnaby, BC: SkillPlan, 2006.
» Through stories about real workers at different Canadian workplaces, these resources look at the reading tasks needed at work. Several of these involve reading documents, and many of the learning activities involve document use.

Reading comprehension: strategies for independent learners. 2nd ed.
Camille Blachowicz, Donna Ogle. New York: Guilford Press, 2008.
» This book presents research-based strategies for comprehension instruction. It offers specific practices to help students compare and evaluate print and online sources, develop vocabulary, build study and test-taking skills, and become motivated readers. Includes sample activities, classroom- and text-based examples, and resource lists for K-9 students. The information may be modified and adapted for working with adult literacy learners.

The reading teacher’s book of lists. 5th ed.
Edward B. Fry, Jacqueline E. Kress. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2006.
» This book is a collection of 218 lists that teachers can use to develop instructional materials and lesson plans. The book is organized into 18 sections: phonics, vocabulary builders, books, useful words, content words, writing, teaching ideas, fluency, assessment, the Internet, language, reference, alphabets and symbols, comprehension, study skills, spelling, English Language Learners, word play.

ReadingWise 1: comprehension strategies that work.
Diane J. Sawyer. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2003.
» This student guide helps students learn to select and use appropriate strategies when they face comprehension problems. Lessons are based on a variety of readings, including newspapers, magazines, charts, how-to instructions, labels and communications. First of an eight-level reading program which gradually grows in difficulty. To be used with the ReadingWise teacher’s guide, which is available separately.

ReadingWise 2: comprehension strategies that work.
Diane J. Sawyer. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2003.
» The second level in the ReadingWise program. Also intended to be used with the teacher’s guide. Book 2 corresponds to grade level 2.

Reading without limits: teaching strategies to build independent reading for life.
Maddie Witter. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2013.
» Gives teachers, schools, and districts the support they need to help their students achieve dramatic academic gains and become lifelong readers. Provides a structure based on choice, shared, and guided reading that rigorously prepares students for high-level literacy achievement. Structured in “mild”, “medium”, and “spicy” action steps, teachers and school leaders can mix and match the tools presented in order to fit the individual needs of their students.

Real life literacy: classroom tools that promote real-world reading and writing. Kathy Paterson. Markham, Ont.: Pembroke Publishers, 2006.
» Twenty-five reading/writing lessons that feature real world uses – vocabulary, a motivational activity and teaching strategies along with samples of common but often misunderstood forms, notices, data sheets, and messages. Designed for students in Grade 5-12 to build reading and writing skills. Includes reproducible pages to use with learners.

Screens and pages: technology and reading for pleasure.
Sally McKeown, Mary Moss and Tracy Slawson. Leicester: NIACE, 2009.
» This book looks at how technology can be used to support and encourage reading for pleasure. It introduces technology such as blogs, wikis, RSS feeds and social networking sites, and also shows how to use technology to make reading more accessible.

A short course in teaching reading: practical techniques for building reading power. 2nd ed.
Beatrice S. Mikulecky. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2011.
» This book begins with an overview of the theory and practice of teaching reading, with special emphasis on meeting the needs of students with limited English proficiency. The second section focuses on individualizing student extensive reading for pleasure. And, the final and largest section explains an approach to teaching reading comprehension. Reading exercises that enable students to strategically apply reading skills are included. The principles apply to teenage through adult learners who already have basic decoding abilities.

Strategies for reading. QLWG Skills for Life. Unit 12. (Online)
http://en.copian.ca/library/learning/cclb/reading/reading.pdf
Vicki-Ann Huegli. Quebec: Quebec Literacy Working Group, 2008.
» This workbook, designed for a distance education course for adult literacy learners, teaches 7 different reading strategies.

Teach someone to read: a step-by-step guide for literacy tutors: including phonics and comprehension assessments.
Nadine Rosenthal. Belmont, Calif.: Fearon/Janus/Quercus, 1987.
» A tutor training guide with a substantial number of pages devoted to helping tutors learn how to create student-centered material.

Teaching adults to read with understanding using the learning progressions.(Online)
http://www.tec.govt.nz/Documents/Publications/Learning-progressions-read-with-understanding.pdf
New Zealand: Tertiary Education Commission, 2008.
» The learning progressions provide a framework that shows what adult learners know and can do at successive points as they develop their expertise in literacy learning. This guide illustrates how the framework can be used to determine the demands of the reading task, assess the learner’s skill level, and select activities for learning and teaching reading

Teaching beginning readers.
Pat Campbell. Edmonton, AB: Grassroots Press, 2010.
» This resource presents ten principles for teaching beginning adult readers and answers three frequently asked questions: Where do I start? Do I need to teach skills in a particular order? What do I teach? This is followed by instructional activities, many geared towards one-to-one tutoring which can be modified for classroom use.

Teaching reading to adults: a balanced approach.
Pat Campbell. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2003.
» Author draws on her experience to integrate participatory theory and practice with the needs of literacy students and available resources.

Teaching reading to adults: a pack of resources and ideas for adult literacies tutors. (Online)
http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/1267/1/downloadresource.htm%3Fid%3D2336
Judith Gawn, Jay Derrick, Samantha Duncan & Irene Schwab. Scotland: Learning Connections, 2009.
» Developed as a support for both teaching and professional development, this resource offers lots of ideas for reading activities and resources drawn from the experiences of practitioners in Scotland.

Think-aloud in communications. (Online video)
http://www.ns.literacy.ca/ttvideo_tacom.htm
Literacy Nova Scotia, featuring Kate Nonesuch. Truro, NS: Literacy Nova Scotia, 2010.
» Demonstrates the think-aloud teaching technique for reading that shows learners some of the strategies that they bring to reading. Part of the Literacy Nova Scotia Teaching Toolbox video series.

Tutor: a collaborative, learner-centred approach to literacy instruction for teen and adults. 8th ed. Ruth Johnson Colvin. Syracuse, NY: ProLiteracy/New Readers Press, 2009.
» This book is designed to give tutors and teachers the tools they need to teach adults and teens basic reading and writing skills.

Wiring the brain for reading: brain-based strategies for teaching literacy.
Marilee Sprenger. San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, 2013.
» This book outlines the neural connections necessary for learning to read, the importance of the body-brain connection, strategies for building phonemic awareness and decoding skills, brain-based techniques for developing vocabulary and building fluency, and memory strategies to reinforce comprehension. Information on brain development applies to both children and adults and is presented in a non-technical way. Instructional strategies are developed for children, but may be adapted for use with adults.

You can teach someone to read: a how-to book for friends, parents, and teachers: step by step detailed directions to provide any reader the necessary tools to easily teach someone to read. 2nd ed.
Lorraine Peoples. Gilbert, Ariz.: GloBooks Pub., 2011.
» Organized into six units, this book includes step-by-step lesson plans, sight words used most often, phonics rules used most often, basic comprehension skills, check lists and tips, built in evaluations and reviews, and learning activities. The book covers basic reading skills needed by all age groups.

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Vocabulary

English for everyday activities: a picture process dictionary. Basic edition. Lawrence J. Zwier. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2002.
» Everyday processes such as shopping, making a phone call, and taking a bus are illustrated with coloured drawings. Key vocabulary is given for each of the activities. This basic edition is intended for beginning ESL students. Accompanying workbook and teacher’s guide are available separately.

Key vocabulary for a safe workplace.
Harry Ringel. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2000.
» A highly flexible tool kit designed to help ESL learners understand the essential language of workplace safety. To be used as part of a prevocational or general ESL course for students preparing to enter the workforce, a class or as a tool to improve understanding of safety terms. Lessons can be used in any order and adapted to individual, pair or group setting. This student book contains all instructional and reference materials.

Vocabulary activities. (Book + CDR)
Penny Ur. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.
» This resource contains ideas for introducing, practising, expanding and exploring vocabulary. It includes word games for a variety of levels, and ideas for using audio, video and computer technology. The accompanying CD-ROM contains print-ready materials.

Vocabulary boosters: workbooks 1, 2 & 3.
Susan Rogers. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2005.
» These workbooks, designed to help adult readers develop vocabulary, are organized around themes of health, wildlife, the environment and popular culture. Each lesson is a non-fiction reading with activities.

Vocabulary building workbook.
Gatineau, QC: Office of Literacy and Essential Skills, HRSDC, 2009.
» This workbook includes 24 lessons with a variety of exercises for learning new words commonly used in the Canadian workplace.

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Workbooks & Teaching Tools

The active reader: books F, 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2010, 2011.
» This series of workbooks each provide 10 leveled reading passages on popular themes. Includes pre-reading, main reading passage, post-reading, vocabulary, dictionary use, mini lesson, literacy practice and word attack. Includes Canadian topics.

Activist series. Set 1, workbook.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2009.
» The activities in this workbook are based on the Activist Series Set 1 biographies. The workbook aims to help beginner readers to develop a strategy-based approach to reading and writing. It contains four units: Mother Teresa, Louis Riel, Mahatma Gandhi, and Eleanor Roosevelt. Each unit focuses on three skill areas: reading comprehension, writing and word attack skills.

Activist series. Set 3, workbook.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2009.
» The activities in this workbook are based on the Activist Series Set 3 biographies. The workbook aims to help beginner readers to develop a strategy-based approach to reading and writing. It contains four units: Rosa Parks, Dalai Lama, David Suzuki, and Elizabeth Fry. Each unit focuses on three skill areas: reading comprehension, writing and word attack skills.

Activist series. Set 4, workbook.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2009.
» The activities in this workbook are based on the Activist Series Set 4 biographies. The workbook aims to help beginner readers to develop a strategy-based approach to reading and writing. It contains four units: Nelson Mandella, Jean Vanier, June Callwood, and Harriet Tubman. Each unit focuses on three skill areas: reading comprehension, writing and word attack skills.

Acts of courage. Workbook.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2009.
» The activities in this workbook are based on the Acts of Courage biographies. The workbook aims to help beginner readers to develop a strategy-based approach to reading and writing. It contains four units: Rick Hanson, Fannie Lou Hamer, Laura Secord and Oskar Schindler. Each unit focuses on three skill areas: reading comprehension, writing and word attack skills.

All new easy true stories: a picture-based beginning reader.
Sandra Heyer. White Plains, NY: Longman, 2004.
» Real believe-it-or-not stories adapted from newspapers and magazines for beginning adult readers.

All new very easy true stories: a picture-based first reader.
Sandra Heyer. White Plains, NY: Pearson/Longman, 2006.
» Fourteen real believe-it-or-not stories adapted from newspapers and magazines for beginning adult readers. Each story is accompanied by pre-reading, pronunciation, spelling, vocabulary, comprehension, speaking and writing exercises.

Basic reading power 1. 3rd ed.
Linda Jeffries, Beatrice S. Mikulecky. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2009.
» This reading textbook, written for students at a beginning level (an English vocabulary of about 300 words), is organized into four parts: extensive reading, vocabulary building, comprehension skills and thinking skills. The four parts are intended to be used concurrently. The focus is for students to look at their reading process and develop a strategic approach to reading.

Best of the reader: teacher’s guide.
Joan Acosta and Jennifer Walsh Marr. Vancouver, BC: Capilano University, 2009.
Also available online at http://www.bestofthereader.ca/Ebooks/Teachers_Guide.pdf
» This book is part of a series called “Best of The Reader”. The stories in the books are from “The Westcoast Reader”, which is a newspaper for adults who are improving their English reading skills. The readers can be used individually, in pairs or in groups. This teacher’s guide contains pre-reading activities, listening and speaking activities, vocabulary development and activities for reading comprehension. See www.bestofthereader.ca for more information on the resource and others like it.

Casino reading skills: participant manual: edition 1.0. (Online)
http://www.gamingcentreofexcellence.ca/essentialskills/workbooks/reading/
Winnipeg, Man.: The Canadian Gaming Centre of Excellence, 2010.
» These resources each begin with a facilitator’s guide. The following workbook is organized into two separate parts: foundations and job families. The foundations section is a review of reading skills for work, including: scanning for information, building vocabulary, reading to remember, reading memos, emails and bulletins, and reading casino manuals, handbooks and procedures. It is organized by topic with each topic including an introduction, examples of the skill in use, and exercises for specific skills. The job family sections contain practice questions organized by level for gaming/casino job families: bank, customer services/administration, food and beverage services, housekeeping and ground, maintenance and facilities, retail, security, slots/electronic gaming/bingo, table games, uniforms and warehouse. Answers are provided.

Even more true stories: an intermediate reader. 3rd ed.
Sarah Heyer. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education, 2007.
» Written for intermediate-level students, this book contains 16 human-interest stories adapted from newspaper and magazines. Includes exercises for vocabulary development, reading comprehension, discussion, and writing. A teacher’s section provides background information and teaching tips.

Famous firsts series workbook.
Linda Kita-Bradley. Edmonton, AB: Grass Roots Press, 2009.
» The activities in this workbook are based on the Famous Firsts Series biographies. The workbook aims to help beginner readers to develop a strategy-based approach to reading and writing. It contains five units: Amelia Earhart, Matthew Henson and Robert Peary, Charles Lindbergh, Edmund Hilary and Tenzing Norgay and the First Women in Space. Each unit focuses on three skill areas: reading comprehension, writing and word attack skills.

High-interest intervention reading folders: main idea. [kit]
High-interest intervention reading folders: making inferences. [kit]
High-interest intervention reading folders: sequencing. [kit]
High-interest intervention reading folders: cause & effect. [kit]
High-interest intervention reading folders: reading for details. [kit]
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2011.
» Designed for small groups of students who need extra support, these visually appealing sets are suitable for adult literacy and ESL small groups as well as 1-1 tutoring. Each set includes 6 copies each of 4 high interest stories with magazine-style graphics that focus on a specific skill, such as sequencing or making inferences. A clear and concise teacher’s lesson plan folder highlights important vocabulary and includes comprehension questions for before, during and after reading. Reading level: Grade 2-3.

High-interest nonfiction text sets. (kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2012.
• Amazing inventions.
• Dangerous animals.
• Incredible plants.
• Modern wonders of the world
• Space phenomena.
• Wild weather.

» This resource is a folder containing 6 copies each of 4 common types of texts: a newspaper, magazine articles, a brochure and an Internet page. The 4 texts gradually increase in difficulty. Text is well illustrated with colour photos. Designed to be used with small groups. The teacher’s guide contains activity ideas, and reproducible worksheets. While these materials have been designed for use with children, they are also appropriate for use with adults.

Hot topics 2.
Cheryl Pavlik. Boston, MA: Thomson/Heinle, 2006.
» Designed to engage readers, stimulate thinking, and provoke conversation while developing vocabulary and reading skills, each chapter contains 3 readings on the same controversial topic from different points of view. The pre-reading questions, skimming and scanning activities, use of context clues, vocabulary analysis and development of critical thinking skills help develop reading fluency and comprehension.

Nonfiction reading comprehension folders: Grades 3-4. [kit]
Nonfiction reading comprehension folders: Grades 5-6. [kit]
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2009.
» Designed for use in small group settings in school classrooms, these sturdy folders are also suitable for adult literacy and ESL small groups and 1-1 tutoring. Each skill-building set includes 6 copies each of 7 different folders and covers important nonfiction text structure, such as cause and effect or compare and contrast. Great illustrations and interesting content will engage learners as they increase their nonfiction reading comprehension. A well laid out guide with a reproducible activity, lesson plan and student assessment for each folder is included.

Reading at work: workplace reader.
Lynda Fownes, Vanya Wong, Corinne Volpatti. Burnaby, BC: SkillPlan, 2005.
Reading at work: facilitator’s guide: companion to the workplace reader.
Jean Tonski. Burnaby, BC: SkillPlan, 2006.
» Through stories about real workers at different Canadian workplaces, these resources look at the reading tasks needed at work. Several of these involve reading documents, and many of the learning activities involve document use.

ReadingWise 1: comprehension strategies that work.
Diane J. Sawyer. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2003.
» This student guide helps students learn to select and use appropriate strategies when they face comprehension problems. Lessons are based on a variety of readings, including newspapers, magazines, charts, how-to instructions, labels and communications. First of an eight-level reading program which gradually grows in difficulty. To be used with the ReadingWise teacher’s guide, which is available separately.

ReadingWise 2: comprehension strategies that work.
Diane J. Sawyer. Syracuse, NY: New Readers Press, 2003.
» The second level in the ReadingWise program. Also intended to be used with the teacher’s guide. Book 2 corresponds to grade level 2.

Select readings. Intermediate: teacher-approved readings for today’s students. 2nd ed.
Linda Lee + Erik Gundersen. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.
» This reading course for intermediate students of English contains high-interest, authentic reading passages for use in reading skills development, vocabulary building, and thought provoking discussions and writing. The readings represent a wide variety of genres and were selected by experienced teachers. Each chapter includes an opening page, pre-reading activities, the reading passage, post-reading activities for comprehension, vocabulary building, and reading and writing skills development. Downloadable audio files for all the main reading passages are available online http://elt.oup.com/student/selectreadings2e/intermediate?cc=ca&selLanguage=en .

True stories behind the songs: a beginning reader.
Sandra Heyer. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2010.
» This book features the lyrics for eight songs along with real, believe-it-or-not stories about the songs and the songwriters. Companion stories related to the topic of the song are included in the units along with exercises for vocabulary development, reading comprehension and writing and speaking practice.

True stories in the news: a beginning reader. 3rd ed. (Book + audio CD)
Sandra Heyer. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2008.
» Twenty-two readings for beginning adult readers based on human interest stories adapted from newspapers and magazines. Includes exercises for vocabulary development, reading comprehension, pronunciation, discussion and writing. The audio CD has recordings of all the stories.

Understanding homographs: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2011.
» These cards reinforce understanding of homographs – words that share the same spelling but have a different meaning. Each card features a homograph, with a simple sentence using both words in context. The accompanying cartoon illustrations show both meanings at once. Definitions for each word are shown at the bottom of each card. The illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but still are useful in an adult setting. A brief instruction sheet is included. Suitable for adult literacy, ESL and family literacy programs.

Understanding homophones: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2008.
» These cards reinforce understanding of homophones – words that sound the same but have a different spelling and meaning. Each card features a different homophone pair, with simple sentences using each word in context. The accompanying cartoon illustrations show both meanings at once. The colourful cartoon illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but still are useful in an adult setting. A brief instruction sheet is included. Suitable for adult literacy, ESL and family literacy programs.

Understanding idioms: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2008.
» These cards reinforce understanding of idioms. Each card features a common idiom, with a sentence using the idiom. The accompanying cartoon illustrations show the literal meaning of the idiom, with an actual definition provided in print. The illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but still are useful in an adult setting. A brief instruction sheet is included. Suitable for adult literacy, ESL and family literacy programs.

Understanding misused words: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2011.
» These 40 cards target recognition of commonly misused words and development of vocabulary. Each card features a different word pair with a simple sentence showing use in context. A brief instruction sheet is included. The accompanying cartoon illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but still are useful in an adult setting. Suitable for adult literacy, ESL and family literacy programs such as afterschool and homework clubs.

Understanding multiple meanings: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2008.
» These cards reinforce the understanding of words that have more than one meaning. Each card features a different multiple meaning word with simple sentences showing use of each meaning in context. The accompanying cartoon illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but the cards are still useful in an adult setting. A brief instruction sheet is included. Suitable for adult literacy, ESL and family literacy programs.

Understanding similes & metaphors: teaching cards. (Kit)
Carson, Calif.: Lakeshore Learning, 2011.
» These cards reinforce the understanding of similes and metaphors. Each card features a different simile or metaphor with a simple sentence showing use in context and an explanation of what the figure of speech means. The accompanying cartoon illustrations are designed for a younger audience, but the cards are still useful in an adult setting. A brief instruction sheet is included. Suitable for one-to-one use with adults.

Wow! Stories from real life: a low-beginning, multi-skills text.
Natalie Hess, Laurel Pollard. Burlingame, CA: Alta Book Center Publishers, 2008.
» This book contains 8 units, each focused on a true story. Exercises for each unit include pre-reading activities and exercises for comprehension, vocabulary and grammar. Designed for beginning students.