UNICEF report on child well-being

UNICEF report on child well-being

UNICEF report on child well-being

Date posted: April 19, 2013

Last week UNICEF released its 11th report card on Child well-being in rich countries: a comparative overview. It measures child well-being in the world’s richest nations. Using 29 indicators, well-being is measured across five dimensions: material well-being, health and safety, education, behaviours and risks, and housing and environment. Of the 29 industrialized countries in the study, Canada ranks overall at 17th, a middle-level ranking. As well as providing information on today’s circumstances, the report card also tracks progress during the past decade.

Here’s an interview with Peter Adamson, author of the report.

UNICEF has produced a Canadian companion to the UNICEF report card that focuses on Canada’s record, the details that led to the ranking, and recommendations to improve the ranking. High points: Canada ranks in the top third in educational achievement by age 15, eating fruit, exercise, non-smoking, and low exposure to air pollution. Low points: Canada ranks in the bottom third in relative child poverty, infant mortality, immunization, participation in further education, overweight, cannabis use, bullying, national homicides, and children’s views of their life satisfaction. This companion document also shows trends over the last decade and outlines actions to improve Canadian children’s well-being.
Not enough time to read the whole document? Here’s a list of the key points for Canada.
And there’s an interactive map displaying results by country.

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